Mind-reading technology reconstructs videos from brain

http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/mindreading-technology-reconstructs-videos-from-brain-20110923-1ko5s.html

  • It sounds like science fiction: while volunteers watched movie clips, a scanner watched their brains. And from their brain activity, a computer made rough reconstructions of what they viewed.
  • In the future, it might help stroke victims or others who have no other way to communicate, said Jack Gallant, a neuroscientist at the University of California, Berkeley, and co-author of the paper

Harvesting ‘limitless’ hydrogen from bacteria

The following was extracted from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-14976893

  • Until now, they explained, an external source of electricity was required in order to power the process.
  • However, the team added, the current cost of operating the new technology is too high to be used commercially.
  • Prof Logan said that the technology to utilise this process to produce hydrogen was called microbial electrolysis cell (MEC).
  • “The breakthrough here is that we do not need to use an electrical power source anymore to provide a little energy into the system.
  • “All we need to do is add some fresh water and some salt water and some membranes, and the electrical potential that is there can provide that power.”

America First-To-Invent to First-To-File

http://www.inventorsdigest.com/archives/7262

  • Now that passage of the America Invents Act (patent reform) is all but certain – it’s only awaiting the President’s signature
  • It is clear that the current first-to-invent system almost never benefits the independent inventor.
  • Further, the cost of proving who was first to invent, under the current system, is prohibitive to small businesses and independent inventors. It costs an average of $400,000 to $500,000 in legal fees to engage in interference proceedings to determine who invented first.
  • So the facts demonstrate that the current system of first-to-invent actually favors those with deep pockets and works to the disadvantage of small companies and independent inventors with limited resources.

Next Invention: Meat ?

Taken from Today(http://www.todayonline.com) on 2 Sep 2011, Page 54